Sunday, June 17, 2018

Waves

or 1. Waves
or 2. Changing light
or 3. Sun
or 4. Changing colors
or 5. Clouds
or 6. Seafishing on coast Scotland
or 7. Silver lining

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Outside and Inside

Last week I was outside.


 Yesterday I was inside.


Its owner paid for a couple of archeological expeditions and in return recieved some replicas of findings. E.g. replica of Nefertiti her head.

Couple of ancient Egypt inspired objects in his house.

Everywhere pictures, drawings and paintings.

Over 4,000 books in the house. Couple in french, mostly german and a notable amount in English.


Now I am curious for his:
  • Travel schedule. He was travelling 10 out of 12 months a year.  Owned 60 houses and a big yacht
  • The languages he spoke
  • What he read. An analysis of his library
  • To what amount he felt in exile in The Netherlands

P.S. He is: here. House is: here.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

18:11

Yesterday at 18:11 hours - I remember looking at the clock because I promished to start cooking dinner at 18 sharp - I finished my book on the Cape Verde Islands. After three years this transcription and translation of 17th century Dutch documents reached its end.

My foreword ends with this. In a nutshell it tells it all:
"The main goal of this annotated translation is to unlock this unique and beautiful 17th century Dutch treasure to humanity. To remove the veil from the Cape Verde Islands. In a time that information and products floated over the seas with – take a deep breath and try to visualize – the speed of a sailing ship. With sailors on them of whom roughly 25% would never see the habour again they started their voyage from."

What is left is checking foot- and endnotes and editing. It will be published as a print-on-demand book.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Where Philosophers End

Her YES. Where did Clarice Lispector's (1920-1970) yes come from? Was she a tabula rasa? Did she not read anything?


Moser in 'Why This World. A Biography of Clarice Lispector' (2009), page 227-228: 
"She was widely and deeply read, as the numerous allusions in her writing and correspondence prove  (...). Clarice's higer education, her work as journalist, her experience in the foreign service, her knowledge of languages, and her practice in living on three continents made her, apart from her own artistic achievement, one of the most sophisticated women of her generation, and not only in Brazil."

On the other hand she was deliberately a "self-thaught" writer, like a "primitive painter". She placed no value on learnedness or sophistication. She was interested in a different kind of knowledge, that had nothing to do with advanced reading or learnedness. Where philosophers end does Clarice begin.

Let me repeat, was Clarice a tabula rasa? Partly yes, as in the image of a discoverer/ student who erases the slate (tabula) by heating the wax and then smoothing it. 

What was Clarice pointing at? At that part of "reality" that can't be said and is a mystery and has to be discovered. At that what she is truly writing, that is neither bad nor good.  At the state of grace. At ... unio mystica.

Christ was Christ for others. Who was Christ for Christ? According to her analyst Azulay (page 327): Clarice for Clarice carried a lot of anxiety; full-time self-centered because she had a difficulty in connecting; she couldn't turn herself off and when her anxiety reached overpowering levels living was a torment for her; at those times she couldn't stand herself and other people couldn't stand her.

Saturday, May 5, 2018

Y..e.s

Embrace life! Say yes to yourselves! Don't dream of an elsewhere in the past or future! 

It's an invitation ... nothing less. I know it's easily put but is there any other way? If not, you will hurt yourselves more than you need to. Some get hurt by nature. Some get hurt by nurture. Some recieve both. Life isn't fair.

For me, embracing life is the psychological equivelant of physical huging. A hug is an image for embracing, yes-saying or affirmation.

In German it's the Nietzschean concept of Verneinung and Bejahung (more). Nein = no or nay. Ja = yes. Nay-saying versus yes-saying. What a sharp observation of Nietzsche. Was Clarice Lispector influenced by this philosophy? (She lived some time in Bern, this is a German-speaking part of Switserland.) Her last sentences in her book 'The Hour of the Star' (1977): "My God, I just remembered that we die. But - but me too?! Don't forget that for now it's strawberry season. Yes."

Bejahung or yes-saying is a healing activitity. It makes sweet and sour whole. It repairs what is broken with gold.


Y..E.S

P.S. You saw this picture before in post 'Literally Illuminated in Gold' (2017).
P.P.S. Next to that just be you.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Blown Away With The Wind

I make a lot of jokes. At work. At home. In a way I am "always" playing (as in Huizinga's homo ludens) with the rocksteady ground of people's (pre)assumptions. A couple of months ago my daughter L. asked: why are you so cynical?

My answer: I love people, being alive and life on planet Earth with everyone and everything on it. I am not cynical because I don't bark as a dog - cynic is derived from the ancient greek word 'kynikos', meaning 'dog-like'. I think, speak, write and live my life as a 'homo sapiens' not as a dog. It's ok for me that every individual 'homo sapiens' is motivated by desire, greed, materialism and all other activities in all steps of Maslow's staircase (more). For me personally it's all vanity but I accept and embrace the fact that people are motivated by it. And I am personally not an exception. I am included.

To live a simple life free of all possessions. What a nonsense! It's never simple. Never free. There will always be possessions. And that individual will only survive by the generiosity of other people.

I am not a cynic because I accept the fact that we are what we are, this is selfish genes. I embrace. I don't bark. I try to look in the mirror as honest as I can. All what we see around us: books, houses, streets, villages, human beings etc it will all be blown away, in let's say 1,000 years from now. All vanity. At the same time the genes of the species 'homo sapiens' will survive. Homo sapiens: individuals die and the species survives. Survive forever? No, in a couple of billions of years from now life on planet Earth will be impossible because our sun will no longer radiate the way it does today and become a red giant (more). So ... some day "we" have to move.  

Your middle class man with sometimes aristocratic daydreams

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Cuckoo

Last Sunday I saw the first #2018 Pinksterbloemen (English 'Cuckoo flower'). Growing on the borders of a creek. Spring has come again on my corner of planet Earth.

 

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Our Air

What about love? For me personally it's something you practise not something to think, analyse or read about. But the truth is I read a book about it this weekend: Corine Koole, 'De zeven wetten van de liefde' (2018). The title of this book translated from Dutch into English: 'The seven laws of love'. Laws is too strong for this book (marketing trick?). It's not about laws, it's about the seven themes Corine found again and again in the more than 1,000 interviews about love she made last ?ten? years. Seven themes:
  • Being in love
  • Desire
  • Sex
  • Great love
  • Eternal love
  • Pain
  • Faithfulness 
Was I surprised? Did I read something new? Flabbergasted? No, all I read felt natural and pretty familiar.


A few quotes I would like to share. A series to describe great love (page 170):
1. A great love makes life whole.
2. The beloved is a constant; against that background everything becomes meaningful.
3. If your partner has disappeared, it feels like real pain in your body.
4. Great love can not be suppressed. Not even after years and years.
5. The great love is like a hug, overwhelming. It protects against anxiety, nervousness.
6. A great love evokes a shared, free energy, as if you are breathing the same air together that is otherwise available to no one else.
7. A big love is nice, exciting, horny.

Faithfulness (page 235): Faithfulness is constant wonderment, faithfulness is looking at the other person, looking very closely, and accepting that the man or woman you are with changes over the years, as everyone changes, grows older, and perhaps flawed. Faithfulness is not sticking to how it used to be and how it started, but rather the change itself. The realization that no day is the same, that perfection does not exist, and that you rejoice in it. (...) Being and staying loyal to a loved one is not something that restricts individuals and prevents individual development, but makes it possible.

Balance (page 239-240). It's all about finding a balance between the sun side and shadow side of the one you love. Embrace the shadow side too of your lover.

Space (page 246). The very heart of love is faithfullness. Give your love the space to be her- or himselves.

In other words, just be you. I don't want anything else. Be like a cat - she always is her divine self. Be like a bird - fly or land whenever you want ... I will not squeeze.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Pins

It's a standing joke in my family. You feel bored? Take a bag of clothespins and play with them! Make a train, a tower (as high as you can) or ... use your imagination.